Butterball, Kroger, other brands of turkey recalled nationwide because of new multistate Salmonella outbreak - Food Safety News thumbnail
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Butterball, Kroger, other brands of turkey recalled nationwide because of new multistate Salmonella outbreak – Food Safety News

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Mount Olive, NC-based Butterball LLC has recalled more than 78,000 pounds of raw ground turkey products in connection with an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Schwarzengrund, according to the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and the CDC.

“Whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 5 clinical isolates predicted antibiotic resistance to streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and public health agencies including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; the Wisconsin Department of Health Services; and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection are investigating the multistate outbreak of Salmonella Schwarzengrund infections. The CDC reported Thursday that there are six confirmed patients from three states who are infected. The patients live in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Carolina.

“FSIS is concerned that some product(s) may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase,” according to the recall notice.

One of the patients had to be admitted to a hospital. No deaths had been confirmed as of March 14, according to the CDC outbreak announcement. Illnesses started on dates ranging from Dec. 19, 2018, through Feb. 2 this year. The confirmed case-patients range in age from less than 1 year to 71 years old. Additional illnesses might not yet be reported because of the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of two to four weeks when the pathogen is Salmonella, the CDC reported.

Wisconsin’s agriculture department collected three intact Butterball brand ground turkey samples from a residence where four of the infected people live. Salmonella isolates identified by laboratory testing in the case patients and turkey samples are closely related, genetically, according to the recall notice.

“… records and unopened ground turkey from a residence where four of the ill people live,” the CDC reported. “Records indicated that the turkey used at the residence was Butterball brand ground turkey.”

The pre-packed raw ground turkey was produced on July 7, 2018. To see labels from the recalled products, please click here. Products subject to this recall are:

48-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “BUTTERBALL everyday Fresh Ground Turkey WITH NATURAL FLAVORING (85% LEAN/15% FAT)” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188, and UPC codes 22655-71555 or 22655-71557 represented on the label.

To see labels from recalled products, please click on this image.
48-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “BUTTERBALL everyday Fresh Ground Turkey WITH NATURAL FLAVORING (93% LEAN/7% FAT)” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188 and UPC code 22655-71556 represented on the label.

16-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “BUTTERBALL everyday Fresh Ground Turkey WITH NATURAL FLAVORING (85% LEAN/15% FAT)” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188 and UPC code 22655-71546 represented on the label.
16-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “BUTTERBALL everyday Fresh Ground Turkey WITH NATURAL FLAVORING (93% LEAN/7% FAT)” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188 and UPC codes 22655-71547 or 22655-71561 represented on the label
48-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “Kroger GROUND TURKEY FRESH 85% LEAN – 15% FAT” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188, and UPC code 111141097993 represented on the label.
48-oz. plastic wrapped tray containing “FOOD LION 15% fat ground turkey with natural flavorings” with sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18, lot code 8188 and UPC code 3582609294 represented on the label.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website.

Recommendations for turkey safetyThe CDC posted tips for consumers with the outbreak announcement:

Don’t eat raw or undercooked turkey.
Cook turkey burgers and mixtures such as casseroles to 165 degrees F internal temperature. Use a food thermometer to make sure poultry and meat have reached a safe internal temperature. You can’t tell whether food is safely cooked by looking at it.

For turkey burgers, insert the thermometer through the side of the patty until it reaches the middle.
Place the thermometer in the thickest part of other poultry or meat items.

When ordering at restaurants, ask that turkey burgers and mixtures be cooked to 165 degrees F internal temperature.
 Wash hands and items that came into contact with raw turkey or other poultry and meat —including countertops, utensils, dishes, and cutting boards — with soap and water.

Watch for symptomsAnyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients need to be hospitalized. 

Older adults, children, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

It is possible for some people to be infected and not get sick or show any symptoms. Such individuals are still able to spread the infection to others.

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